Chargers History

Chargers countdown to 2020: Best player in team history to wear No. 60

Hamilton Tiger-Cats offensive line coach Dennis McKnight (Photo by Brent Just/Getty Images)
Hamilton Tiger-Cats offensive line coach Dennis McKnight (Photo by Brent Just/Getty Images)
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With 60 days left until the Chargers kick off their 2020 campaign, Bolt Beat explores the best player in team history to wear No. 60.

There are officially 60 days left until the Los Angeles Chargers kick off their 2020 campaign and look to make some serious headway in the AFC West.

Yesterday, we hit it off with 61 days left and broke down the best player in team history to wear No. 61. To no one’s surprise, center Nick Hardwick was the selection for this particular number.

Since we’re in the midst of offensive linemen, who is the one Charger who stands out among all others who have donned No. 60 during their times with San Diego/Los Angeles?

Fortunately, it’s another player who’s quite the no-brainer.

The best No. 60 in Los Angeles Chargers history: Dennis McKnight

As far as durability and ferocity in the trenches go, few offensive linemen in franchise history had more of a reputation than offensive guard Dennis McKnight.

The former Drake lineman came to San Diego back in 1982 but didn’t earn regular starting duties until his second season at the pro level when he managed to start nine games.

From that point until his tenure with the team ended in 1988, McKnight was the epitome of reliability, starting every regular-season game aside from the four he missed due to injury during the 1987 season.

During that time, McKnight sure pancaked more than his fair share of opponents’ defenders.

McKnight primarily played guard. But he was versatile enough during his career to play a multitude of spots wherever the Chargers needed him. Coming off a Pro Bowl alternate campaign in 1989, McKnight suffered a career-altering quad injury which forced him to miss the rest of the year.

The injury ultimately ended his notable tenure in San Diego.

“I do feel older,” McKnight told the Los Angeles Times after the injury. “It is a sign that the end is coming. I’m appreciating and enjoying things more now. I won’t hate practice as much. I think when the season starts, I’ll enjoy it more.”

McKnight spent 1990 and 1992 with the Detroit Lions, also spending the 1991 season with the Philadelphia Eagles, and those three seasons combined for just 15 starts.

Next. 5 most experienced players on Chargers roster entering 2020

Following his notable NFL career, McKnight would go on to enjoy a successful coaching career within the college ranks, the CFL and the XFL.

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