Chargers Draft

History reveals which combine drills matter to Chargers’ coaches

INDIANAPOLIS, IN - FEBRUARY 25: Head coach Anthony Lynn of the Los Angeles Chargers speaks to the media at the Indiana Convention Center on February 25, 2020 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Michael Hickey/Getty Images) *** Local Capture *** Anthony Lynn
INDIANAPOLIS, IN - FEBRUARY 25: Head coach Anthony Lynn of the Los Angeles Chargers speaks to the media at the Indiana Convention Center on February 25, 2020 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Michael Hickey/Getty Images) *** Local Capture *** Anthony Lynn
facebooktwitterreddit
1 of 3
INDIANAPOLIS, IN – FEBRUARY 25: General manager Tom Telesco of the Los Angeles Chargers speaks to the media at the Indiana Convention Center on February 25, 2020 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Michael Hickey/Getty Images) *** Local Capture *** Tom Telesco
INDIANAPOLIS, IN – FEBRUARY 25: General manager Tom Telesco of the Los Angeles Chargers speaks to the media at the Indiana Convention Center on February 25, 2020 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Michael Hickey/Getty Images) *** Local Capture *** Tom Telesco

The annual  NFL combine creates a massive spreadsheet of player performance data that is often overhyped. However, based on past LA Chargers draft trends, it appears that there are some numbers that are relevant to Chargers’ coaches.

With the NFL combine ongoing, the Chargers draft team is being flooded with new information and statistics that could influence their draft-day decisions.

However, the relevance of the NFL combine to eventual player performance is frequently debated, and the Chargers’ coaches must have their own opinions on each drill and what matters to them.

By examining the past two drafts, the value of different components of the combine can be assessed. Below is a list of some common combine drills and whether or not they matter to Chargers’ coaches.

40-yard Dash: Matters for non-line positions, including quarterback

The 40-yard dash is one of the most celebrated events at the combine, with headlines being made each year for prospects that approach the record.

While you will not see the Chargers going out of their way to pick blazing-fast players, they certainly appear to have been actively avoiding slow players, perhaps both to emulate and defend against the speedy offense of the Kansas City Chiefs.

Both Chargers linebackers who were drafted last year (Drue Tranquill and Emeke Egbule) ran respectable times of 4.57 seconds and 4.65 seconds. Neither are earth-shattering, but both are decent.

However, it is certainly worth noting that Easton Stick’s 40-yard time of 4.62 is well above average for a quarterback, fitting in with Anthony Lynn’s desire for a mobile quarterback. While this does not mean that the Chargers have to have a fast quarterback, it means that a time like Justin Herbert’s 4.68 is noteworthy for the team.

facebooktwitterreddit