LA Chargers News

What the Chargers should look for in their next quarterback

By Faustino Felix
CARSON, CA - DECEMBER 22: Quarterback Philip Rivers #17 of the Los Angeles Chargers gestures as he can't hear the play call because of noise in the second half of the game against the Oakland Raiders at Dignity Health Sports Park on December 22, 2019 in Carson, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)
CARSON, CA - DECEMBER 22: Quarterback Philip Rivers #17 of the Los Angeles Chargers gestures as he can't hear the play call because of noise in the second half of the game against the Oakland Raiders at Dignity Health Sports Park on December 22, 2019 in Carson, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images) /
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CARSON, CA – AUGUST 24: Tyrod Taylor #5 of the Los Angeles Chargers runs out of the pocket to get away from Mychal Kendricks #56 of the Seattle Seahawks in the first quarter during a preseason NFL football game at Dignity Health Sports Park on August 24, 2019, in Carson, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)
CARSON, CA – AUGUST 24: Tyrod Taylor #5 of the Los Angeles Chargers runs out of the pocket to get away from Mychal Kendricks #56 of the Seattle Seahawks in the first quarter during a preseason NFL football game at Dignity Health Sports Park on August 24, 2019, in Carson, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images) /

Mobile quarterback vs. Pocket passer

First of all, there is no reason why a pocket passer cannot be mobile. The NFL is moving to an era of mobility in the quarterback position.

Even in contemporary west coast offenses, and other offenses in the league that rely on the pass, it’s becoming more and more essential for a quarterback to have the ability to escape the pocket and make plays with his feet, at least with effective scrambling.

But many NFL offenses are implementing offenses that take advantage of their quarterback’s mobility with designed quarterback runs that add another dimension to the offense.

Draft prospects like Hurts from Oklahoma, who runs more like a running back than a quarterback, can help the Chargers move in that direction, while free agents like Mariota and even potential trade acquisitions like Cam Newton can also add that dimension to the Chargers’ offense if that is where they want to go.

Taylor is an in-house option with premium mobility who is also distinguished as a pocket passer who takes great care of the football. Most draft prospects now possess great athleticism and can learn much from Taylor’s game to become elite.

Should the Chargers wish to remain with a quarterback that plays from the pocket, like Rivers did (although you can’t find a less mobile quarterback than Rivers anywhere), there are also options in either free agency or the draft.

Other veteran free agents like Brees or Brady, the latter of whom has been heavily linked to the Chargers, conform to that style of quarterback. Draft prospects like Eason or Herbert, who are very athletic but don’t necessarily fill up the rushing stat sheets, are other quarterbacks that can be of interest for the Chargers.

While the Chargers could go either way in what they demand of their quarterback, Lynn’s offense will probably work best with a mobile quarterback, rather than an aging veteran like Brees, Brady, or Rivers himself, who may still be franchise tagged.

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