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Chargers recent failure to address positions of need is concerning

MIAMI, FLORIDA - SEPTEMBER 29: Michael Davis #43 of the Los Angeles Chargers celebrates with Drue Tranquill #49 after a interception against the Miami Dolphins during the fourth quarter at Hard Rock Stadium on September 29, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FLORIDA - SEPTEMBER 29: Michael Davis #43 of the Los Angeles Chargers celebrates with Drue Tranquill #49 after a interception against the Miami Dolphins during the fourth quarter at Hard Rock Stadium on September 29, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images)
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NASHVILLE, TN – OCTOBER 20: Corey Davis #84 of the Tennessee Titans catches a touchdown pass in between Drue Tranquill #49 and Denzel Perryman #52 of the Los Angeles Chargers at Nissan Stadium on October 20, 2019 in Nashville, Tennessee. (Photo by Wesley Hitt/Getty Images)
NASHVILLE, TN – OCTOBER 20: Corey Davis #84 of the Tennessee Titans catches a touchdown pass in between Drue Tranquill #49 and Denzel Perryman #52 of the Los Angeles Chargers at Nissan Stadium on October 20, 2019 in Nashville, Tennessee. (Photo by Wesley Hitt/Getty Images)

Chargers: Conclusions from 2019 and concerns for 2020

An analysis of the Chargers level of play at these positions of need in 2019 shows that there was very little improvement from the 2018 to 2019 season. While the linebacker depth issue was addressed, the offensive line and number two corner positions largely deteriorated from last year.

While the blame for this largely falls on the general manager, there are many reasons to give Telesco a break. Some of the blame for positional regression must fall on the positional coaches, who work to get improvement from each player from season to season.

Furthermore, while the offensive line should have been more heavily addressed in the offseason, nobody could predict that so many starters would miss extended time in 2019.

Next. Chargers top 5 positional needs heading into 2020

Thus, while it is fair to describe the 2019 offseason as a failure, no one individual is completely to blame for this failure. However, it does raise significant questions about the front office’s handling of positions of need. Hopefully, more will be done to address those concerns in the 2020 offseason.

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