Chargers Draft

How conservative Chargers would approach this offseason

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA - NOVEMBER 07: Clelin Ferrell #96 of the Oakland Raiders sacks Philip Rivers #17 of the Los Angeles Chargers at RingCentral Coliseum on November 07, 2019 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA - NOVEMBER 07: Clelin Ferrell #96 of the Oakland Raiders sacks Philip Rivers #17 of the Los Angeles Chargers at RingCentral Coliseum on November 07, 2019 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
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CARSON, CALIFORNIA – NOVEMBER 03: Philip Rivers #17 of the Los Angeles Chargers passes as he is rushed by Rashan Gary #52 of the Green Bay Packers in front of Russell Okung #76 during the game at Dignity Health Sports Park on November 03, 2019 in Carson, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
CARSON, CALIFORNIA – NOVEMBER 03: Philip Rivers #17 of the Los Angeles Chargers passes as he is rushed by Rashan Gary #52 of the Green Bay Packers in front of Russell Okung #76 during the game at Dignity Health Sports Park on November 03, 2019 in Carson, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

Chargers: All their offensive line decisions

If the Chargers go with the conservative route, here’s their Week 1 starting lineup:

  • LT: Russell Okung
  • LG: Dan Feeney or Forrest Lamp
  • C: Mike Pouncey (though it’s easily Scott Quessenberry if the veteran retires)
  • RG: Michael Schofield
  • RT: Free agent or draft pick

If the Chargers keep Sam Tevi at right tackle next year, they’re dumber than I thought. However, there’s no way (fans hope) they can make that mistake again. Whether it be a free agent (where Telesco is better), the seventh overall selection, or a first-round faller stolen in the second round, the Chargers will find some way to fix the right tackle position.

However, everywhere else remains basically the same. Of the five positions, right tackle is the most glaring issue, followed by left guard. Okung has Trey Pipkins to back him up, so the Chargers probably feel they are fine there. Schofield would need to be re-signed to a short deal, and in many ways he’s earned it.

Next. Chargers biggest needs heading into 2020

So that’s what a conservative approach to the offseason looks like for the Chargers. It’s not the worst idea, but it is a “maintain the same” kind of scenario. The Chargers were 12-4 in 2018, and are truly a dozen plays away from a 10-6 or better record this year. If they believe a few breaks will go their way in 2020, don’t be surprised to see the Chargers take this very approach

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