LA Chargers News

Chargers notebook: Offensive line, Austin Ekeler’s usage, playcalling

NASHVILLE, TN - OCTOBER 20: Philip Rivers #17 of the Los Angeles Chargers signals at the line of scrimmage during a game against the Tennessee Titans at Nissan Stadium on October 20, 2019 in Nashville, Tennessee. The Titans defeated the Chargers 23-20. (Photo by Wesley Hitt/Getty Images)
NASHVILLE, TN - OCTOBER 20: Philip Rivers #17 of the Los Angeles Chargers signals at the line of scrimmage during a game against the Tennessee Titans at Nissan Stadium on October 20, 2019 in Nashville, Tennessee. The Titans defeated the Chargers 23-20. (Photo by Wesley Hitt/Getty Images)
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SAN DIEGO, CA – AUGUST 08: Offensive Coordinator Ken Whisenhunt of the San Diego Chargers during warm-up before the game against the Seattle Seahawks at Qualcomm Stadium on August 8, 2013, in San Diego, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
SAN DIEGO, CA – AUGUST 08: Offensive Coordinator Ken Whisenhunt of the San Diego Chargers during warm-up before the game against the Seattle Seahawks at Qualcomm Stadium on August 8, 2013, in San Diego, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

What is wrong with the Chargers’ offensive scheme?

This one is interesting, and it’s been narrowed down to two things. This team desperately misses… Jackson and Tyrell Williams. Not what you were expecting? Well, you aren’t alone. While studying the Chargers offense and really diving into what could be going wrong, there is a big gaping hole that wasn’t there last year. A true deep threat.

Williams did so much for this offense, in allowing Allen to work underneath, and getting Mike Williams open deep on the other side of the field. It was the perfect trio that could make an offense take off.

Then you have Jackson, who on film is the best runner on the Chargers roster. Ekeler is the better player, for sure, but Jackson finds such smalls gaps to squeeze through and pick up that extra chunk. It is a trait that is sorely missed as of now, and it wouldn’t be surprising to see the Chargers at 4-3 if Jackson never gets hurt.

Jackson has an ability to stack his moves, meaning that when he makes a move, he is already moving into his next. It’s something that allowed him to make a difference for this offense and find yardage when no yardage was available.

Back to Williams, the team tried to get Travis Benjamin to fill the role. That experiment was awful and painful to watch. We won’t even talk about it. Now, Andre Patton and Geremy Davis are the wide receivers that rotate through. Well, that’s fine, but neither are the kind of guy to take the top off a defense.

Davis is a solid 50/50 guy, while Patton is more of an intermediate possession receiver, something Mike Williams already does well. The one who could fix all of this didn’t get a single offensive snap against the Titans. Jason Moore.

Moore has played five total snaps for the Chargers’ offense and has two catches for 43 yards in those five snaps. He needs more time on the field, as he can possibly be the spark the offense needs to start firing on all cylinders and get moving. If Moore can finally be a guy to take the top off the defense, things will truly open up at last.

Yes, Ken Whisenhunt deserves some blame for the play calling, but Telesco and Lynn deserve more blame for not giving Whisenhunt a replacement for Williams, and instead opting to rely on  Benjamin to fill the role.

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