LA Chargers News

Los Angeles Chargers: Three steals and two bad deals

CARSON, CALIFORNIA - DECEMBER 22: Uchenna Nwosu #42 of the Los Angeles Chargers celebrates his stop of Lamar Jackson #8 on third down with Isaac Rochell #98 during the first quarter at StubHub Center on December 22, 2018 in Carson, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
CARSON, CALIFORNIA - DECEMBER 22: Uchenna Nwosu #42 of the Los Angeles Chargers celebrates his stop of Lamar Jackson #8 on third down with Isaac Rochell #98 during the first quarter at StubHub Center on December 22, 2018 in Carson, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
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CARSON, CA – OCTOBER 07: Defensive end Melvin Ingram #54 of the Los Angeles Chargers celebrates a sack with defensive end Isaac Rochell #98 and outside linebacker Jatavis Brown #57 in the first quarter against the Oakland Raiders at StubHub Center on October 7, 2018, in Carson, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
CARSON, CA – OCTOBER 07: Defensive end Melvin Ingram #54 of the Los Angeles Chargers celebrates a sack with defensive end Isaac Rochell #98 and outside linebacker Jatavis Brown #57 in the first quarter against the Oakland Raiders at StubHub Center on October 7, 2018, in Carson, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

Chargers underachiever No. 1: Melvin Ingram

It is a bit rough to put Ingram on this list because he is certainly not the problem on this Chargers team at the moment.

This season, Ingram has been, in a word, average. Ingram played the majority of four games this season before suffering a hamstring injury that has caused him to miss the last two. Below is a comparison of his statistics in the four games he played and the statistics of Uchenna Nwosu, Ingram’s direct backup.

Ingram in weeks 1-4: Solo Tackles: 11, Assisted Tackles: 3, Tackles for Loss: 3, Sacks: 1, Forced Fumbles: 0, PFF Grade: 69.8

Nwosu in weeks 5-6: Solo Tackles: 6, Assisted Tackles: 3, Tackles for Loss: 1, Sacks: 1, Forced Fumbles: 1, PFF Grade: 76.9

What you should notice is that the two are barely different based on stats, with Nwosu likely having a slight advantage. When a second-year player learning to play consistently at an NFL level is playing better than the player being paid the second-most on the team at $16 million per year, you have a problem.

Another thing you should notice is that this is a relatively small sample size. Ingram has only played one quarter of the entire season. There is certainly still time for Ingram to demonstrate his value to the team and prove that he is deserving of the contract he has.

However, Ingram is paid like a star, but he is playing like an average edge rusher, which is why he is on this list. He has not played poor enough for the Chargers to consider trading him or dumping his contract, but he has played like a $6-7 million man while being paid $10 million per year more.

Hopefully, Ingram can prove the Chargers right and perform to the level that he has in the past and the level that his talent indicates he can, but he is deserving of a spot on this list for now.

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