LA Chargers News

Chargers’ position group of the month: Defensive backs

MIAMI, FL - SEPTEMBER 29: Desmond King #20 of the Los Angeles Chargers tackles Josh Rosen #3 of the Miami Dolphins during the third quarter of the game at Hard Rock Stadium on September 29, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - SEPTEMBER 29: Desmond King #20 of the Los Angeles Chargers tackles Josh Rosen #3 of the Miami Dolphins during the third quarter of the game at Hard Rock Stadium on September 29, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)
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MIAMI, FL – SEPTEMBER 29: Xavien Howard #25 of the Miami Dolphins and Casey Hayward #26 of the Los Angeles Chargers trade jerseys after the game at Hard Rock Stadium on September 29, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL – SEPTEMBER 29: Xavien Howard #25 of the Miami Dolphins and Casey Hayward #26 of the Los Angeles Chargers trade jerseys after the game at Hard Rock Stadium on September 29, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)

You can’t convince this writer otherwise. Casey Hayward is still an elite corner in the league. Many fans and analysts will point to his lack of interceptions over the last two years to state otherwise, but as you’ll hear from me a lot, stats don’t tell the whole story. Context matters.

Hayward rarely sees the ball thrown his way, and he wins most of the battles that the other teams do pick. Hayward has proven repeatedly that he is one of the most important players on this team, yet he is still doubted up until the point he adds another interception to the stat sheet.

Casey Hayward interception! Look at how weird this pick is. OPI call too. pic.twitter.com/yAZZEPRobz

— Ian Wharton (@NFLFilmStudy) September 15, 2019

Well, it didn’t take him long this season. He snagged one when he was tested. Hayward brings a lot to this Chargers defense. He offers them the potential to do other things around the field because he bring a confidence to the coaching staff that he can lock down his side of the field. Let the safety help Davis or Facyson, and let Casey do the dirty work.

Deandre Hopkins is perhaps the best wide receiver in the game, except he isn’t because Allen is better, but moving on. Hopkins is perhaps the second-best wide receiver in the game, and he legitimately struggled when he had to deal with Hayward. Struggled. Hayward wasn’t allowing him the big plays, he wasn’t allowing him even the easy crossers. Hayward was always there, and that is a humongous asset to a defense when you can have a guy play like that.

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