LA Chargers News

Past trades that could impact Melvin Gordon’s future

CARSON, CA - OCTOBER 07: Running back Melvin Gordon #28 of the Los Angeles Chargers makes a 34 yard run in the second quarter against the Oakland Raiders at StubHub Center on October 7, 2018 in Carson, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)
CARSON, CA - OCTOBER 07: Running back Melvin Gordon #28 of the Los Angeles Chargers makes a 34 yard run in the second quarter against the Oakland Raiders at StubHub Center on October 7, 2018 in Carson, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)
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CARSON, CA – OCTOBER 07: Running back Melvin Gordon #28 of the Los Angeles Chargers makes a 34 yard run in the second quarter against the Oakland Raiders at StubHub Center on October 7, 2018 in Carson, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)
CARSON, CA – OCTOBER 07: Running back Melvin Gordon #28 of the Los Angeles Chargers makes a 34 yard run in the second quarter against the Oakland Raiders at StubHub Center on October 7, 2018 in Carson, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)

Melvin Gordon demanding a trade would be a big blow for the Chargers’ Super Bowl hopes, but could it be better for both sides? The team could look to past trades in order to determine the market for a potential return.

After a poor rookie season, Melvin Gordon has blossomed into a star running back with the Los Angeles Chargers. It seems he is not content with playing out the last year of his rookie deal and then working on a contract extension with the team after the upcoming season.

Los Angeles running back Melvin Gordon has informed the Chargers that unless he receives a new contract, he will not report to training camp and he will demand a trade, his agent Fletcher Smith told ESPN.

— Adam Schefter (@AdamSchefter) July 11, 2019

Instead, he is hoping to come to terms with an extension now, rather than play under his fifth-year option or a future franchise tag. Gordon has proved himself an elite running back; since 2016, he has the second-most overall touchdowns from scrimmage with 38. He knows his value and is hoping to get paid as such. That being said, most of the league is going with the running back by committee approach. Trading star players is hardly unprecedented, but trading a running back of Gordon’s caliber in his prime would be. If the team does decide to go that route there are past trades the team could look at to gauge how the trade market values running backs.

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