Chargers Draft

Chargers’ eight best 2019 offseason decisions thus far

TUCSON, AZ - SEPTEMBER 09: Linebackers Emeke Egbule #8 and Matthew Adams #9 of the Houston Cougars celebrate after a safety by the Arizona Wildcats in the second half at Arizona Stadium on September 9, 2017 in Tucson, Arizona. The Houston Cougars won 19-16. (Photo by Jennifer Stewart/Getty Images)
TUCSON, AZ - SEPTEMBER 09: Linebackers Emeke Egbule #8 and Matthew Adams #9 of the Houston Cougars celebrate after a safety by the Arizona Wildcats in the second half at Arizona Stadium on September 9, 2017 in Tucson, Arizona. The Houston Cougars won 19-16. (Photo by Jennifer Stewart/Getty Images)
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IOWA CITY, IOWA- SEPTEMBER 17: Defensive end Anthony Nelson #98 of the Iowa Hawkeyes grabs the ankle of quarterback Easton Stick #12 of the North Dakota State Bisons in the second quarter, on September 17, 2016 at Kinnick Stadium in Iowa City, Iowa. (Photo by Matthew Holst/Getty Images)
IOWA CITY, IOWA- SEPTEMBER 17: Defensive end Anthony Nelson #98 of the Iowa Hawkeyes grabs the ankle of quarterback Easton Stick #12 of the North Dakota State Bisons in the second quarter, on September 17, 2016 at Kinnick Stadium in Iowa City, Iowa. (Photo by Matthew Holst/Getty Images)

Chargers’ best decision No. 7: Changes at QB

Additions: Tyrod Taylor (FA), Easton Stick (Draft)

Departures: Geno Smith (SEA)

What happened: Arguably the Chargers’ biggest free agent acquisition thus far is Tyrod Taylor, a veteran quarterback who has spent eight years in the league with three different teams. Taylor signed a two-year, $11 million deal to sit behind Philip Rivers.

The team doubled down on quarterback additions with their fifth-round selection of Easton Stick out of North Dakota State. Stick is unlikely to see game action this season, and is seen as a developmental project with years to learn an NFL system.

Why it’s a good decision: Do the Chargers need to spend $11 million on a quarterback who, for most fans, will hopefully never see the field? Maybe not. But paying Taylor a premium to join the team is necessary; after all, what else do the Chargers do if Rivers goes down? With Geno Smith departing in free agency, only Cardale Jones remained. The organization has not had a truly capable quarterback behind Rivers in years, but Taylor can step in and win a game if needed.

Stick brings a different kind of athleticism, more in line with what Taylor can do than the baby giraffe wearing No. 17. If he develops, fantastic; if not, he’s a fifth-round pick. His selection will likely push Jones off the team, which is an experiment with a 2018 expiration date.

There may be something else here: the Chargers may be looking at what kind of quarterback they would like to take in the future. They know how well the offense runs with Rivers under center; what does it look like with a mobile veteran like Taylor, or a young athlete like Stick? The Chargers will have a chance to see how their offense operates with three different men.

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